Data & Information

Data and Information

Community Health System Analysis

  • One-third (32.2%) of Knox County adults 18 years and older are obese, based on height and weight measures collected at the time of the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (BRFS) administration. The 2007 level represents a significant rise over 2004 at 21.5%, and dramatically above Illinois at 24.4%. In 2007, an additional third (35.7%) of adults are overweight, meaning that more than two in three (67.9%) Knox County adults are considered overweight or obese.
  • Obesity is a leading risk factor for diabetes. Based on BRFS data, one in ten (10.6%) Knox County adults ages 18 years and older reports having diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases sharply after age 45. Synthetic estimates based on national levels as reported in National Center for Health Statistics’ National Health Interview Survey 2004 show 2% of the 18-44 year olds, 10.1% of 45-64, and 18.9% of ages 65-74 affected by this disease. Using these prevalence rates, an estimated 3,408 persons in Knox County suffer from diabetes.
  • For the five-year period 2003-2007, diabetes was responsible for an average of 20 deaths per year. Diabetes accounted for 19 Knox County deaths in 2007, a rate of 36.6 per 100,000 population, far surpassing the state at 22.2 and U.S. at 23.7. Like the nation, diabetes ranked seventh among death causes in the county. Age-adjusted rates, which eliminate differences due to age, show the Knox County’s 2007 diabetes death rate at 25.9 to be higher than the U.S., 22.5, though the gap is far smaller than comparing crude rates.
  • Using a three-year composite 2004-2006, diabetes accounted for 3% of total Knox County deaths, almost double the proportion as ten years prior at 1.7%. One-third (33.3%) of 2006 Knox County deaths due to diabetes occurred to persons under age 65, far higher than the premature mortality rate due to all causes at 19.3%. Among ages 25-44, diabetes placed fifth highest among death causes (2004-2006 data).

 

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