Daily Requirements

Fruits, Berries, and Melons

List of common Fruits

Apples – Apricots – Bananas – Blueberries – Cantaloupe – Cherries – Grapefruit – Grapes – Honeydew – Kiwi fruit – Lemons – Limes – Mangoes – Nectarines – Oranges – Peaches – Pears – Papaya – Pineapple – Plums – Prunes – Raisins – Raspberries – Strawberries – Tangerines – Watermelon

What you need daily

Generally 2-4 servings a day. Check out your daily requirements by age under the daily requirements button.

Benefits (from choosemyplate.gov)

  • “Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and protect against certain types of cancers.
  • Eating vegetables and fruits rich in potassium as part of an overall healthy diet may lower blood pressure, and may also reduce the risk of developing kidney stones and help to decrease bone loss.
  • Eating foods such as fruits that are lower in calories per cup instead of some other higher-calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake.
  • Vitamin C is important for growth and repair of all body tissues, helps heal cuts and wounds, and keeps teeth and gums healthy.”

Source: Own Work
Author: Elina Mark

Vegetables

List of common Vegetables

Acorn squash – Artichokes – Asparagus – Avocado – Bean sprouts – Beets – Black beans – Black-eyed peas – Bok choy – Broccoli – Brussels sprouts – Butternut squash – Cabbage – Carrots – Cassava –  Cauliflower – Celery – Collard greens – Corn – Cucumbers – Dark green – leafy lettuce – Eggplant – Fresh cowpeas, field peas, or black-eyed peas (not dry) – Garbanzo beans (chickpeas) – Green bananas – Green beans – Green lima beans – Green peas – Green peppers – Hubbard squash – Iceberg (head) lettuce – Kale – Kidney beans – Lentils – Mesclun – Mushrooms – Mustard greens – Navy beans – Okra – Onions – Parsnips – Pinto beans – Plantains – Potatoes – Pumpkin – Red peppers – Romaine lettuce – Soy beans – Spinach – Sweet potatoes – Tomatoes – Turnip greens – Turnips – Water chestnuts – White beans – Zucchini

What you need daily

Generally you need 3-5 servings a day. Check out your daily requirements by age under the daily requirements button.

Benefits (from choosemyplate.gov)

  • “Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and protect against certain types of cancers.
  • Dietary fiber from vegetables, as part of an overall healthy diet, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as vegetables help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories.
  • Vitamin A keeps eyes and skin healthy and helps to protect against infections.”

Author: Fir0002/Flagstaffotos

Grains

List of Whole Grains (try to eat more of these!)

Amaranth – Brown rice – Buckwheat – Bulgur (cracked wheat) – Millet – Oatmeal – Popcorn (without butter!) – Rolled oats – Quinoa – Sorghum – Whole grain barley – Whole grain cornmeal – Whole rye – Whole wheat bread – Whole wheat crackers – Whole wheat pasta – Whole wheat sandwich buns and rolls – Whole wheat tortillas – Wild rice

List of refined Grains (try to eat less of these !)

Cornbread – Corn tortillas – Couscous – Crackers – Flour tortillas – Grits – Noodles – Pitas – Pretzels – White bread – White sandwich buns and rolls – White rice

What you need daily

Generally you need 6-11 servings a day. Check out your daily requirements by age under the daily requirements button.

Benefits (from choosemyplate.gov)

  • Consuming whole grains as part of a healthy diet may reduce the risk of heart disease, may reduce constipation, and help with weight management.
  • Eating grain products fortified with folate before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects during fetal development.
  • Grains are important sources of many nutrients, including dietary fiber, several B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and folate), and minerals (iron, magnesium, and selenium).
  • Dietary fiber from whole grains or other foods, may help reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as whole grains help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories.
Glass of Milk

Source: Own Work
Author: Stefan Kühn

Dairy

List of common dairy products

American Cheese – Cheddar cheese – Cottage cheese – Fat-free (skim) – Greek yogurt – Lactose-free milks – Lactose-reduced milks – Low fat (1%) milk or reduced (2%) milk – Mozzarella cheese – Parmesan cheese – Ricotta cheese – Swiss cheese – Whole milk – Yogurt

What you need daily

Generally you need2-3 servings a day. Check out your daily requirements by age under the daily requirements button.

Benefits (from choosemyplate.gov)

  • Intake of dairy products is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, and with lower blood pressure in adults.
  • Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Dairy products, especially yogurt, fluid milk, and soymilk (soy beverage), provide potassium.
  • Milk products that are consumed in their low-fat or fat-free forms provide little or no solid fat.

Source: Own Work
Author: Rudolph.A.furtado

Protein

List of common proteins

Cuts of meat

Bison – Beef – Beef Liver – Ham – Lamb – Pork – Veal – Venison

Ground meat

Beef – Pork – Lamb

Poultry and eggs

Chicken – Duck – Goose – Turkey – Chicken eggs – Ground chicken – Ground turkey

Seafood

Catfish – Cod – Flounder – Haddock – Halibut – Mackerel – Pollock – Salmon – Sea bass – Snapper – Swordfish – Trout – Tuna

Shellfish

Clams – Crabs – Crayfish – Lobster – Mussels – Oysters – Scallops – Shrimp

Beans and peas

Black beans – Black eyed peas – Chickpeas (garbanzo beans) – Falafel – Kidney beans – Lentils – Lima beans (mature) – Navy beans – Pinto beans – Soy beans – White beans

Nuts and seeds

Almonds – Cashews – Hazelnuts – Mixed nuts – Peanuts – Peanut butter – Pecans – Pistachios – Pumpkin Seeds – Sesame seeds – Sunflower seeds – Walnuts

Processed soy products

Tofu – Veggie Burgers – Tempeh

What you need daily

Generally you need 2-3 servings a day. Check out your daily requirements by age under the daily requirements button.

Benefits (from choosemyplate.gov)

  • Proteins function as building blocks for bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood. They are also building blocks for enzymes, hormones, and vitamins. Proteins are one of three nutrients that provide calories (the others are fat and carbohydrates).
  • EPA and DHA are omega-3 fatty acids found in varying amounts in seafood. Eating 8 ounces per week of seafood may help reduce the risk for heart disease. The health benefits from consuming seafood outweigh the health risk associated with mercury, a heavy metal found in seafood in varying levels.
  • Diets that are high in saturated fats raise “bad” cholesterol levels in the blood. The “bad” cholesterol is called LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. High LDL cholesterol, in turn, increases the risk for coronary heart disease. Some food choices in this group are high in saturated fat. These include fatty cuts of beef, pork, and lamb; regular (75% to 85% lean) ground beef; regular sausages, hot dogs, and bacon; some luncheon meats such as regular bologna and salami; and some poultry such as duck. To help keep blood cholesterol levels healthy, limit the amount of these foods you eat.
  • Diets that are high in cholesterol can raise LDL cholesterol levels in the blood. Cholesterol is only found in foods from animal sources. Some foods from this group are high in cholesterol. These include egg yolks (egg whites are cholesterol-free) and organ meats such as liver and giblets. To help keep blood cholesterol levels healthy, limit the amount of these foods you eat.
  • Because nuts and seeds are high in calories, eat them in small portions and use them to replace other protein foods, like some meat or poultry, rather than adding them to what you already eat. In addition, choose unsalted nuts and seeds to help reduce sodium intakes.

Source: choosemyplate.gov

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